Wednesday, April 25, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Jeremy C. Shipp

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJeremy C. Shipp

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
Sing, play guitar and piano, paint (walls and such), tile floors, perform psychokinesis on plastic straws, juggle, cartwheel, make funny faces. I can also transform into a flying hippo--I just choose not to.


5. Who are you reading right now?
JK Rowling, Jesse Gordon, Aimee Bender, HG Wells


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
People who fill me with love, and systems that fill me with horror.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
When writing a story, I do occasionally jot down ideas to use later, but I don’t work well with extensive outlines. They tend to turn on me when I least expect it, kick me when I’m down, and flick my earlobes. I prefer not knowing too many details about what’s going to happen in a tale, because the not knowing is fun to me.


13. Celebrity crush.
Donald Trump. This is assuming that what you’re really asking me is, “If you were a giant Cyclops, which celebrity would you crush with your bare hands?” I’m choosing Trump because of his monstrous personal attacks against Rosie O’Donnell. A cycloptic execution is too harsh, you might say? Don’t worry. Trump would survive the assault, as he purchased a titanium exoskeleton back in ’94.


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?

15. Do you still watch cartoons?
I love watching, writing, and creating cartoons. A production company recently optioned my original TV show script “Captain Smitty.” Someday (fingers and toes crossed) it may end up going into some sort of production. I’ve also written, animated, voiced, etc. my own cartoon show and movie called Planet Palz. It’s about a couple of talking planets and their stupid adventures. As far as what I enjoy watching, I’m a big anime otaku, and Arthur will always be one of the greats.


Jeremy C. Shipp is an author whose written creations inhabit various magazines, anthologies, and drawers. These include over 30 publications, the likes of ChiZine, Flesh and Blood, Bare Bone, The Harrow, Until Someone Loses an Eye, and Darkness Rising. While preparing for the forthcoming collapse of civilization, Jeremy enjoys living in Southern California in a moderately haunted Victorian farmhouse. He's currently working on many stories and novels and is losing his hair, though not because of the ghosts. Vacation, his first published novel, debutes this month from Raw Dog Screaming Press.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketVacation

Monday, April 23, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Linnea Sinclair

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLinnea Sinclair

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Hmm, that really depends on the mood I’m in. Chaz (Gabriel’s Ghost) Bergren is one I enjoy playing with a lot but that might be because the book is written in first person POV so it’s a more intimate experience for the writer. I’m looking forward to getting back to her in CHASIDAH’S CHOICE (Bantam, 2008). But I’m really enjoying Detective Sergeant Theo Petrakos, because I’ve placed him in such an untenable situation in The Down Home Zombie Blues (November 2007 from Bantam). He’s a Florida homicide cop who suddenly finds himself the partner—and prisoner—of an intergalactic zombie hunter, who also happens to be one hot space-babe. And then there’s Sass—Captan Tasha Sebastian in Games of Command. She has attitude. I can relate to that.


2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Coffee. Gevalia, any dark roast. Black with one Splenda. Café Cubano is my all time favorite though. Rocket fuel.


4. What else can you do besides write?
Well, I’m a former news reporter, including a stint as a TV news anchor. And I’m a retired private investigator. Used to carry a badge and a gun but believe me, never “pretended” to be a cop. I have the utmost respect for those in law enforcement and have no desire to get shot at. As a PI I worked in the field of civil law predominantly. The gun was strictly self-protection. Yes, I received death threats.

I also play piano, organ, guitar and harp (way out of practice on the last two). I make a terrific Caesar salad and apricot-glazed Cornish Game hens. A great Coq-au-Vin, too.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
Any scene where the hero and heroine are emotionally at odds with each other is tough for me. Since I write to an HEA (Happily Ever After) it pains me when they’re pained. There’s a scene in Gabriel's Ghost (RITA award winner!) in Chapter 16 where Chaz—really for the first time—tells Sully to stay completely out of her life. That’s it. Over. He tries to apologize. She’ll have none of it. That was killer for me to write. I could feel his shame, his desolation. And I was writing in HER POV! It killed me.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
Everywhere. Anywhere. My mind never stops. It’s always “what-iffing”. It can be a song. It can be something I overhear while waiting in line at the SweetBay supermarket. It can be a news story. Anything. Gee, what would happen if…?


9. Food you could eat everyday.
Thai. Love red and green curry. Love the Thai mixture of curry and coconut. When we go on a Holland America cruise (they have Indonesian and Philippino crew) I eagerly await the “local” buffet where they feature the dishes of one or the other. Curried eggs…ummm!


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Linnea Sinclair is a former news reporter and retired private detective who yearns for more adventure than 'Hold the presses!' and stacks of case files can provide. The role of starship captain was her dream long before James T ever uttered "Beam me up!". Writing stories is her way of living that dream.

When she's not tinkering with a recalcitrant sublight drive, you can find her in southwest Florida living with her very patient husband, Robert Bernadino, and two thoroughly spoiled cats, Daq and Doozy.

This week she will be a guest at Romantic Times BOOKLovers Convention in Houston, TX. Visit her at these events:

Tues April 24 – Advanced Writer Program: Characterization Workshop

Wed April 25 – Intergalactic Bar & Grille Readers’ Party

Thurs April 26 – Starships and Sword Fights: Writing Sci Fi Romance Workshop

Thurs April 26 – Faery Ball!

Fri April 27 – Hijinks and Hot Kisses: Writing Action-Adventure Workshop

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - WEEK 11

Here is this week's line up for HEIDI'S PICK SIX:

Monday - Linnea Sinclair / Science Fiction

Wednesday - Jeremy C. Shipp / Horror

Friday - Kealan Patrick Burke / Horror


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Friday, April 20, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Robert Tinnell

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketRobert Tinnell

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Wow, that's tough. I really love Cotton Coleridge from The Wicked West books because he's this educated man who is also at home in nature and in these incredibly tough situations and in spite of the living hell he goes through he never loses his basic decency and humanity. I'm also quite partial to Terry Sharp - the Brit movie director by day who fights supernatural forces by night. I love the notion of a fellow who generally works "in his head" having this whole action side. Plus I get to play around in the world once populated by Hammer Films so - what's not to like?

Of course, there are several characters I'm crazy about in Feast of the Seven Fishes, but they're based on real-life family members so I guess they don't count. Ditto The Chelation Kid which deals with my son's autism.


2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
4. What else can you do besides write?

5. Who are you reading right now?
I have a bad habit of reading several books simultaneously. I just finished The Last Witchfinder by James Morrow - which is brilliant. I'm reading Mountain Lion by Chris Bolgiano - I love books like that - The Nine Mile Wolves, The Lost Grizzlies and so on. I'm rooting for the wolves to come back. I'm also reading Gibbons' Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Yeah, I'm a weird guy. I love football. I lettered in football, basketball and track in high school - which I guess is strange for a comic book/horror movie geek. I enjoy the Pittsburgh Steelers and NCAA basketball. I still do a lot of hiking and fly fishing. Used to practice aikido quite a bit but don't get to anymore.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?
Great question - one I've never been asked. I'm even skipping pop culture vs. Academia (the latter wins, btw). I write to music generally. For horror I write to Goblin (they scored much of Argento's work and the original Dawn of the Dead). I love Celtic in all its incarnations - particularly a fiddler from Canada named Ashley McIsaac.

I love Classical and jazz - though I'd hardly call myself an expert or even someone of refined tastes. But if you can't find something to inspire you in Beethoven or Vivaldi or Dave Brubeck - well, more's the pity. I just enjoy the music as an antidote to the utter crap on the radio. Not that I'm a snob - I just find current pop/rock music for the most part boring.

I've always loved Springsteen. Love The Pretenders, Allman Brothers, Pink Floyd, Dave Matthews, Rusted Root. I really resist corporate music - I mean, for the most part I think they've killed country. There are always exceptions to be sure but generally. I love Johnny Cash. Dwight Yoakum. Patsy Cline. Waylon. Willie. Hey, I am from West Virginia.

I wish I had a better signal for WYEP out of Pittsburgh. The best station in the US for my money - lots of great Americana. Oh, currently listening to The Little Willies - an album that really works for my wife and me.


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I meticulously outline my stuff. Anyway I that say this it's going to come out bad but to do otherwise, in my opinion, does a great disservice to the work and the reader. I've heard people say that outlining is confining - but like storyboarding in film I think the opposite is true. A good outline gives you the confidence to leap into unknown areas.


13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
How much time do we have? I think they shift as we mature. Initially, stuff like To Kill a Mockingbird, Hammer films with Cushing and Lee, Lugosi and Karloff, Dark Shadows, and going fishing with my grandfather and watching him perform magic tricks. As I grew older, James Whale,Neal Adams, Marv Wolfman, Archie Goodwin, Stephen King, Terence Fisher, George Romero, Walt Simonson, Monty Python. Older still - David Lean, Dario Argento, Mario Bava, Martin Scorcese, David Pirie, Bruce Springsteen. Older still - Peter Straub, James Ellroy, Alan Moore, Kurt Busiek, Edward Abbey, John Geirach, Turner (landscape painter), Edward Hopper (painter - love him). The scary thing is I'm just getting started...


15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Robert Tinnell is a screenwriter, director and author whose works include the films Frankenstein and Me and Believe and the graphic novels The Black Forest, The Living and the Dead, and Sight Unseen. His book, Feast of the Seven Fishes was nominated for an Eisner Award for Best Graphic Album - Reprint. Currently, Tinnell is writing The Chelation Kid, a webcomic dealing with his son's autism, and EZ Streets in collaboration with Mark Wheatley as well as various screenwriting and directing projects.

Tinnell lives in WV with his wife and two children.

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Tom Piccirilli

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketTom Piccirilli and Lord Byron

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
4. What else can you do besides write?
5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
It's one I've actually written several times over. It concerns the death of my mother during a short illness and stay in the hospital. Quite possibly the worst night of my life, and I was in such a raw place and my senses were so flayed that the details have stuck with me like almost nothing else. In an effort to purge myself of the burden of that experience, and to try to make it all bearable, I've written about that night several times in short stories and most notably in my novel Headstone City.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
It's easier to ask where it doesn't come from. Everything inspires in its own way, I never know what might cause the kernel of an idea or get the snowball rolling.


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Hell no, unless you consider reaching into the drive-through window of McDonald's to get my Double cheeseburgers a physical activity. Do you, Heidi? Haven't we had this conversation the last time I took you out to dinner and you complained that there was too much ketchup on your Big Mac? You're just never satisfied!


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I don't outline and I take them along for the ride, usually in the death seat. Writing more "free-style" doesn't mean the writer isn't in control or just vomits out a story without a beginning, middle, or end. It's still a difficult, gut-wrenching process that takes a lot of effort and focus.


13. Celebrity crush.
Angelina Jolie has been crushin' on and stalking me for years.


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?

15. Do you still watch cartoons?
Aside from anime, in which I occasionally indulge, and Family Guy, South Park, Futurama and The Simpsons, I still get caught up in Bugs, Roadrunner, Pepe le Pew, and Popeye whenever I happen to stumble upon them.


Tom Piccirilli is the author of fifteen novels including The Dead Letters, Headstone City, A Choir of Ill Children, and November Mourns. He has also penned numerous short stories for anthologies, magazines, and chapbooks, some of which feature his infamous Panecraft Asylum.

Tom is married to author Michelle Scalise.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMichelle Scalise and Tom Piccirilli

You can join his newsletter at Epitaphs: The Tom Piccirilli Website.

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

Seton Hill Author News

#1: Congratulations to Traci Castleberry, this year's winner of the Seton Hill University McLaughlin Scholarship in writing.

#2: I recently put up a World Map on MySpace and am looking to fill it up with guest pins. While you're there, feel free to friend me.

#3: Venessa Giunta has started a new feature on her blog called Friday Markets and Monday Contests where she will be highlighting 3-5 magazines/markets/contests. She kicked it all off yesterday.

#4: Chapter four of Assassin Study by Maria V. Snyder is up at eHarlequin.com.


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Monday, April 16, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Patricia Bray

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPatricia Bray

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?

2. Tell me about your travels.
Every year I go on a biking trip. So far I've been to Maryland's Eastern Shore, Ireland (Kerry), Vermont, Nantucket, Maine, Nova Scotia, Blue Ridge Mountains, New York's Finger Lakes, Bryce/Zion in Utah, Quebec province and the Canadian Rockies. This year I'll be going to Crater Lake, Oregon. It's a chance to get away from everything (including the internet), and recharge myself.

None of these locations has been directly featured in my stories, but the way you interact with the landscape when you're out in all kinds of weather, traveling under your own power is something that informs how I write about my characters' own journeys.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Yes, yes, yes.


4. What else can you do besides write?
Before writing consumed my time and creative energy, I was a quilter. My quilting had much in common with my writing style—periods of inactivity followed by bursts of frenetic quilting. My friend Stacey and I would take "Quilt-in-a-Day" classes, but rather than one quilt we'd make two separate quilts in that time. The instructor would warn the class that we were maniacs, and they shouldn't compare themselves to us.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?

9. Food you could eat everyday.
Oatmeal. I have it for breakfast every day when I'm at home.


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?

11. What kind of music speaks to you?
Folk music, particularly Irish and Scottish. I've an extensive repertoire of drinking songs and sea chanteys, and will often break into song when I'm doing repetitive tasks. I also like to listen to music when I'm writing, usually the same set of CDs over and over again for the entire novel.


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I outline extensively in my head and on paper. Before I start to write, I already know the beginning, middle and end of the story. If it's a new project, by the time I have the first two or three chapters written, I'll have an outline describing all of the turning points, and descriptions of each of the major characters. If I'm pitching a series, then the outline for the subsequent books in the series may only be a couple of pages long, but I'll continue to flesh them out as the project progresses.

I've just started work on the last book in the Chronicles of Josan, and I'm looking forward to finally writing scenes that I've had in my head for the past two years.


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Patricia Bray began her career writing historical romances set in Regency England before making the leap to epic fantasy with her Sword of Change trilogy. A resident of upstate New York, Patricia balances her writing with a full-time career as an I/T project manager.

In 2006 she launched a new fantasy series with the publication of The First Betrayal. The next book in the series, The Sea Change, will be released by Bantam Spectra in July 2007.

Saturday, April 14, 2007

Book Tour: Synergy Virtual Book Launch

Book Tours

M. D. Benoit will be available to chat with visitors about her new book Synergy from 8pm EST on April 15 to 8am EST on April 16. When you visit the site, you can learn about the book, watch a video about it, and enter a contest for signed copies.


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Friday, April 13, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Leslie Davis Guccione

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLeslie Davis Guccione

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Hands down my 6 hard scrabble cranberry growing Branigan brothers. The most fun a girl can have on paper.


2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
Edit. I love helping the next generation of writers and as a mentor and via my occasional freelance manuscript critiques WORDS@WORK, I’ve discovered it’s far more fun to work on and criticize other people’s work.


5. Who are you reading right now?
I’m revisiting the work of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings (Cross Creek; The Yearling) and Scott Berg’s bio of her renowned editor–of-all-editors Maxwell Perkins. My photo was taken at her FL homestead next to the famed Remington typewriter on the porch. A recent pilgrimage.


6. Pop culture or academia?
I studied painting with Carolyn Wyeth for my degree in studio art and my books, Silhouette romances, are fun reads for young readers. Pop culture all the way.


7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
My books pay the mortgage so I never have had the luxury of waiting for inspiration. I just pull from life around me. (Cranberry growers; harbor masters; sailors; lobstermen; a deaf teenage neighbor; now Baby Boomer issues)


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
My son is a semi-pro snowboarder and my son-in-law a sailmaker and professional sailor. I married a sky diver (Do we see a trend here?) but I got him out of planes and into boats. I follow all of the above which is a lot easier than doing them.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

With the simultaneous sales of a YA and adult romantic suspense novel, Leslie Davis Guccione left public relations and fundraising copywriting to concentrate on fiction. To date she has published twenty-eight novels for adult, middle grade and teen readers, as well as articles on the craft of writing. Her books have garnered awards, starred reviews and genre fiction best seller status.

Her work for adults began with two Avon romantic suspense titles. She moved to Harlequin/Silhouette where every title for the Desire line topped B. Dalton, Waldenbooks and other bookstore bestseller lists. Two were featured as “Man of the Month” lead titles and her single title Bittersweet Harvest evolved into the six-book Branigan Brothers series. She was Harlequin/Silhouette’s “Author of the Month” during the release of Borrowed Baby for the Yours Truly line.

Her work has been translated into eight languages. She has been a finalist and judge for the RWA RITA awards. As Kate Chester she created and wrote the six book Hear No Evil series for Scholastic. Six of her books for teen readers feature deaf protagonists; Tell Me How the Wind Sounds has been optioned for television. Her works for young readers have been book club and readers’ choice selections as well as classroom required reading. Two titles have been featured in Hornbook Magazine’s “Musings” column.

In 2000 she took a break from fiction to teach, write articles on the craft and establish WORDS @ WORK, her manuscript review service. She is currently mentor and adjunct faculty member for Seton Hill University’s masters program: Writing Popular Fiction. Professional memberships have included The Authors Guild, Romance Writers of America (RWA) and The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI).

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Timons Esaias

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketTimons Esaias

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?

2. Tell me about your travels.
I've been around most of the contiguous 48 and into parts of Canada, and did a lot of that as a teen and in my 20's. But real out-of-my-culture overseas travel? I put that off far too long. My first overseas trip (I was 34) was 3 months in Turkey plus a two-week side-trip into Greece to see Delphi. A wonderful experience (except for being stuck on Chios for a week), and it put the travel bug into my system. Since then I've been to Japan, Hungary, Carpathian Rumania, Iceland, and three times to the UK. And I guess I've been to Germany four times, though I've never been outside the Frankfort airport.

Travel is wonderful; travel is massively educational; travel turns abstract concepts into realities and memories; travel is IT; and dammit, I can't afford to travel these days. Sigh.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
I can hand-set type from a California case, put it into a chase, and then print from it with a hand press. Not much call for that these days. Learned this as a child, and as part of it I learned to proofread upside down and backwards.

I was a general contractor for years, mostly carpentry, and then a building manager (glorified janitor) so I can build things and maintain them, if the arthritis lets me.

I'm a fair-to-middlin' chess player, and a right mean historical wargame player.

I can also handle a lot of the odds and ends of academia; but otherwise I'm not much use.


5. Who are you reading right now?
I'm reading excerpts from the diary of Amar Singh (the book is Reversing the Gaze and there's a review here)who had a rather interesting life story. He was a Rajput military officer and administrator who straddled the Indian and British Colonial worlds; was part of the relief expedition to Peking; fought in WWI in Iraq, on the Basra front (why does that sound so familiar?)and so on. To practice his English, he kept a diary in English, every day, for all his adult life.

I'm reading the second volume of John Lloyd Stephens' Incidents of Travel in Yucatan, which allows me to travel vicariously both in space and in time (1840s).

I'm grinding through a truly awful poetry collection from 1918, A Treasury of War Poetry, just so that I can write an essay about it.

And I've read a few chapters into Singularity Sky by Charlie Stross. Oh, and Plutarch and Josephus and, well, too many others.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I've worked both ways. A couple of my stories, including my first big breakthrough, came literally all in a minute and I had to rush to get them down before I forgot. A few others I started with an idea, or a first paragraph, and then just let it rip. ("Osmund Considers," which was recently anthologized, was simply an attempt to create a world that could have a three-masted, barque-rigged submarine with a Texas deck -- and it would fit right in.)

The rest have been carefully structured and outlined. I have the same rate of commercial and critical success with all three methods, so I certainly can't support any claims that there's one superior way to go about things.


13. Celebrity crush.
Yeah, those can be a real problem. When Arthur Miller let Marilyn Monroe break him down, it seems to have made the rest of us fair game. What is it with celebrities and their obsession with writers, anyway???

I've been pretty lucky so far; only had to deal with two celebrity crushes. The first one was flattering, in a way, and fortunately she backed off after a couple of firm e-mails. The other time, though, we had to get a restraining order. Ugly business. That got the point across, though. We haven't had to renew the order. Yet.


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
Charles Dickens was the first influence, because I started reading him in second grade. (Long story about that: teacher took it, parents descended like Avenging Angels, Tim learned that books were something to fight for.)

Ray Bradbury and Stanislaw Lem both showed me that you could do real literary work with SF, and Le Guin and Banks and Murakami and Ishiguro have kept it in my mind. I should mention Brunner in there, too.

William Gibson gave me permission to just throw a whole new world at the reader, without spoon-feeding; as did Ian McDonald's Out on Blue Six.

And Solzhenitsyn.


15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Timons Esaias is a writer and poet living in Pittsburgh. His short stories, ranging from literary to genre, have been published in fourteen languages. He has over a hundred poems in print, including Spanish, Swedish and Chinese translations, in markets ranging from Asimov’s Science Fiction to Elysian Fields Quarterly: The Literary Journal of Baseball. His poetry chapbook The Influence of Pigeons on Architecture is in its second edition. He has also been a finalist for the British Science Fiction Award, and has had numerous Honorable Mentions in Gardner Dozois’s annual Year’s Best Science Fiction anthologies. He is Adjunct Faculty at Seton Hill University, in the Writing Popular Fiction M.A. Program.

Monday, April 09, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Sean Williams

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSean Williams Photo by Beth Gwinn

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Skender Van Haasteren X from the Books of the Change/Cataclysm. He's me as I was when I was a teenager: smart but at the same time terribly dense, and hopeless with girls. He's a geek dropped into a fantasy setting, and I have a great time writing him. I've used him in six books so far, and while I have no plans for any more at the moment, I won't rule anything out. He's so much fun to torture.


2. Tell me about your travels.
Most of it is for work. I come to the US at least once a year for the Writers of the Future presentation ceremony, and I try also to get to a WorldCon or World Fantasy every couple of years. Work takes me around Australia pretty regularly. I've been to several places in Asia, and New Zealand, but apart from a short stop in London I've never been to Europe. That, partly, is why I can't write fantasy in the Tolkein vein. Snow? Never seen it. Forests and wide rivers? Completely outside my experience. Freezing to death? Inconceivable!

Like everyone else, I also travel through time at the rate of one second per second. That thought gives me a little buzz whenever it occurs to me. For now, though, we're very much trapped to that particular conveyor belt, and I can't wait for the day someone invents a temporal accelerator (or brake). The temptation would be very strong to put the foot down on either pedal. Hard.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
I'll pass on all three, unless the caffeine has been removed and the milk is soy. A water-based hot chocolate is my morning drink of choice (marshmallow optional).


4. What else can you do besides write?
5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
Back in 1995, I wrote a story called "Passing the Bone". It's about a man murdered in the central Australian opal mining town of Coober Pedy. All the men in his family have been cursed to die young and become undead, so he wakes up as a zombie with only two thoughts in his mind: to get revenge on his murderer, and to say goodbye to his young son, who lives on the other side of the country. It's kind of a zombie road story, because this poor dude has to get to Sydney before he disintegrates. It could've been played for laughs, I guess, but at the time I wasn't feeling much like laughing.

At the time, I was trying to get my head around the bond I had developed with a child who wasn't genetically mine but who I had come to think of as a son. His mother and I had had a kind of falling out; things were tense and awkward; I was confronting the possibility that Seb and I might not always be in the kind of relationship we'd become used to. A very painful wrench seemed very much on the cards. So the scene where the main character in "Passing the Bone" does finally come face to face with his boy, and has to say farewell to him forever, was absolutely horrible. It might also have been the best scene I've ever written. (Who was it who talked about writing on the edge of your emotions? A wise person, that one.)

Anyway, Seb, his mother, and I got over that little hurdle, and we're still extremely close. He remains the son of my heart. I'm glad that life has had a happy ending, even if the story it inspired did not.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?

11. What kind of music speaks to you?
All kinds. Music is my other true love. In an alternate universe, I chose music ahead of writing, and I'm now composing scores for shows like Angel and Lost. (I wish!) Music from every imaginable genre interests me, but I'm very particular about what I listen to, if that makes sense. I'm not indiscriminate.

When I'm writing, I can't listen to anything too boisterous, or anything with lyrics, so the majority of the time I'm playing artists like Steve Roach or Biosphere--musicians capable of creating music with intense ambient energy. Not New Wave, exactly, and certainly not for background listening, but giving off a vibe that helps me tap into my own creativity without getting in the way. Only when I step back from the laptop and do other things do I get to crank up the stereo and sing along. My current favorite band is The Whitest Boy Alive. That music really speaks to me, in a happy/angsty/80s kinda way. I am a teenager again when they're coming out the speakers. That's occasionally a good thing.

(Small plug: sometimes my love of certain musicians runs to unusual lengths. See here for my recent experiences with Gary Numan.)


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?

13. Celebrity crush.
Zhang Ziyi for her role in The House of Flying Daggers. *swoon*


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Sean Williams writes for adults, young adults and children. Multiple winner of Australia's speculative fiction awards, New York Times-bestseller and judge of the Writers of the Future Contest, he lives with his family in South Australia. His twenty-second novel Saturn Returns is out this month.

"A compelling story of personal bravery and loyalty set against a huge backdrop of galactic disaster and the very end of civilization"
-Kevin J Anderson

Saturday, April 07, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Jeremy Yoder

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJeremy Yoder

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?

2. Tell me about your travels.
Actually, I'm a big homebody. I've lived in Iowa, Minnesota, and now South Dakota, so all I do is hop borders every few years. However, I met my wife through a missions trip to Russia, and I've been to England and Holland, but other than driving through a few states during vacations, that's about it.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
None of the above. Much to my annoyance, soda pop is my bane, and I have the cavities to prove it. I have a love-hate relationship with Mountain Dew similar to Gollum's relationship with the One Ring. *Precious yellow liquid... how we hates it.*


4. What else can you do besides write?

5. Who are you reading right now?
Watership Down by Richard Adams, then maybe Jonathon Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke. (If Neil Gaiman gives the latter such high praise, it must be worth putting on my radar.)


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
What is this "physical activities" concept you speak of? I'm a computer programmer by day and struggling writer by night, both of which require my butt in a chair for hours on end. But thankfully, my wife and two-year-old daughter occasionally yank me into the sunlight to remind me about life.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
Excuse me while I uncurl myself from the fetal position at hearing the word "outline." For me, outlining sucks the joy out of creation and discovery, so I start with only a vague layout in my head. But inevitably, I reach a point where I have to stop and flesh out the details or it turns into rambling. If it's a longer story, I'll then force myself to compose an outline, but I try to do it quickly. (Do you know hard it is to type while in the fetal position?)


13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?

15. Do you still watch cartoons?
Watch cartoons? Do you think I'm an adolescent or something? I'm more of an intellectual, so I instead read cartoon books. I mean, comic books. Ok, ok, so I still watch cartoons. What of it? Why are you staring at me? Can't a grown man watch cartoons in peace? *stands up* This interview is over! Now excuse me while I go watch Justice League... I mean, read James Joyce.


Jeremy Yoder has several publications, including two sales to the Star Trek: Strange New Worlds anthologies series, volumes 9 and the upcoming 10. With Fantasist Enterprises, he has been in Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy, Fantastical Visions III, and Cloaked in Shadow: Dark Tales of Elves.
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While working a day job as a mild-mannered programmer, at night he dons spandex and writes in the privacy of his home, much to everyone's relief. However, he is currently more infatuated with his two-year-old daughter than his writing. As a result, the novels he once read have been replaced by board books written by the likes of Dr. Seuss and Sandra Boynton... and he loves it.

Friday, April 06, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Susan Sielinski

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSusan Sielinski

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?

2. Tell me about your travels.
My husband was a field engineer for General Electric for the first ten years of our marriage, and we traveled for most of that time. So, we've been to China, Hong Kong, Bali, Cebu, Singapore, Brazil, Canada, Buenos Aries, Holland, Belgium, France, Germany, and (the strangest of all) Indiana. During this long spate of globe trotting, I learned that the true definition of "adventure" is "cold, tired, hungry, wet, and why is everyone running the other way?" Actually, I learned that in the first day. We kept at it anyway, and it's the best education I could ever have had for writing.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Tea. Great rivers of Twinings Lady Grey tea. Sometimes with frothy milk, always with cat hair.


4. What else can you do besides write?
I crochet like someone with OCD. I sing with the Roanoke Symphony Orchestra Chorus. I love to cook and bake. I do not claim to do any of these things well, but I do them a lot.


5. Who are you reading right now?
I like to graze non-fiction, a little here, a little there, magpie-ing bits of history (shiny!) and shamelessly using them to my own ends in stories. I'm reading The Hive: The Story of the Honey Bee and Us, by Bee Wilson (no kidding, that really is her name), A Needle in the Right Hand of God: The Norman Conquest of 1066 and the Making of the Bayeux Tapestry, by R. Howard Bloch, and Salt, by Mark Kurlansky. In a fit of self-improvement (these never last long, fortunately), I'm reading The Seven Basic Plots by Christopher Booker, The Bread Bible by Rose Levy Beranbaum, and The War of Art, by Steven Pressfield. In fiction, I'm reading Gates of Fire, also by Steven Pressfield, and my husband just finished reading Terry Pratchett's Going Postal to me. (He now refuses to read Pratchett to me at meals, since tea came out my nose last time. Chicken.)


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I do outline extensively before I write, but by the time I get to that point, I've usually imagined the story in great detail. I spend a lot of time daydreaming--before I fall asleep at night, while exercising, and a lot while driving (if you see a green Ford with Virginia plates trundling along the rumble strips of highway 81, it's probably me). I HATE to sit down to the computer without a clear idea of where I want a story to go. In fact, I won't sit down to write if I don't have that. I'll pet the plants, water the cats, drag race dust bunnies down the hallway, anything but face the blank page without a plan. I know some writers will not talk about a story they are working on, for fear of bleeding off their enthusiasm for it. I enjoy telling the story, usually to my husband, and the more I tell it and we talk about it, the more enthusiastic I am about writing it. So, I will have worked over a story a lot before I outline it, and I'll follow that outline very closely when I do sit down to write. The outline isn't set in stone, but if I make changes, I'll change the outline to reflect that before I begin writing again.


13. Celebrity crush.
Mighty Mouse. How can you resist a rodent in yellow tights? Hey, I was five.


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Susan Sielinski lives in the mountains of Southwestern Virginia with her husband Clint and their cats Mischief and Mayhem. She swears the next cat will be named Coma or Tranquilizer. Susan graduated from Seton Hill's Writing Popular Fiction Program in January 2006 and the Odyssey Writing Workshop in 2001. Since one summer of Odyssey wasn't torment enough, in 2003 she took a job as Odyssey Administrator and now spends June and July in New Hampshire making the workshop trains run on time. Susan's short story "Just Temping" is coming out this April in Fantasist Enterprises' poetically named anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy. Check it out and see what happens when The Girl Next Door ends up temping as an Evil Overlord.
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Thursday, April 05, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - A. G. Devitt

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketA. G. Devitt

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

"I am rather cautious about which six to pick…it seems a bit revealing, as if which questions I choose to answer says more about me than my actual answers ever could…
So I will choose at random."


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
This is a tough question to answer, since all of my characters contain elements of myself. I method write just as one method acts. I have to make myself feel what each character feels in order to write from their point of view. My current favorite character to write is Fender, the protagonist of my upcoming comic book series, Channels. I think emotionally, he and I are on the same wavelength. I understand him and his motivations more than any character I have ever written. I know what drives him. It’s a natural performance for me to be in his head.


2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
Your mother.

Seriously though, I can fight. In fact, my fighting influences my writing more than one would expect. I’ve practiced martial arts since I was a child, and there is a rhythm to it. Hard, fast jabs. Fluid movements. Conservation of energy. I try to write the same way I fight. Spare prose. Keep moving. Don’t waste time or energy.

I also don’t think I’m too bad of a teacher.


5. Who are you reading right now?

6. Pop culture or academia?
I’m a college professor who writes comic books. That should tell you something about my views on this subject. I believe that there exists in academia a sort of self-perpetuating need to justify our careers by over-emphasizing our exclusivity. There is an elitism in academia I find distasteful. Walk up to a science professor or a business professor and, after a few drinks, they will probably admit to believing that English teachers are a dime a dozen. That anyone could teach English. And I think academics in my field sense this and react to it. And they often overreact to it. How quickly they forget that Shakespeare was pop culture.

I see no greater merit in the works of Shakespeare than I do Stan Lee. They are both important. They both hold great truths. They are both immortal.


7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
I have my muses…And I am grateful to them. But I think the thing that really fuels me is my atheism. I have no gods. I have no afterlife. This is my only trip through this big bad beautiful world, and I want it to matter. I am childless and plan to remain that way, so my only shot at making my mark is through the record I leave behind. For me, the purpose of life is to observe. To witness. Those of us who are lucky enough get to write it down so that those of us who weren’t around to experience a poetic moment are able to.
I don’t understand how people don’t write…


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
I don’t care about team sports, or anything professional on TV. I am in the gym at least five days a week. I am fanatical about working out. And it has nothing to do with vanity. My body is a machine, and machines need maintenance. A machine that sits around is not going to work properly when you need it to. I eat with the same philosophy. I don’t eat for enjoyment. Food is fuel. No one I know would piss in their gas tank, but they will shove a Big Mac down their throat. I don’t get it…

Plus, I write while I exercise. It frees my mind of the stress and lets me play in my head while my body does its thing. Later in the shower I usually organize all the random thoughts I had while exercising. Then I’m ready to put them to paper…


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I never outline, but I know people who do. As stated, I method write. Each piece I do is largely improvisational acting done on paper. I have general ideas of things I want to happen. For Channels, I have big picture things that need to happen and I have story arcs that need to span a certain number of issues, but inside of that framework I just let things play out. It’s the only way I can keep myself interested. You wouldn’t read a book you already know the ending to--why the hell would you write one?


13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

A.G. Devitt is a writer and educator. His latest short story, "Assassin's Playground", will be published in the fantasy anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy, coming in April 2007.
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His current project is a comic book series, Channels, which features a boy with a TV for a head. The series will debut in August of 2007 from FE Comics.

Devitt was also the writer/creator of the independent comics Monk, Mortal Coyle, Doug & Punk's Pulp Adventures, and The Custodian. He collaborated with artist Brandon Dawley on Insensitive Romance's Angry Guy Stories.

In addition to his writing, Devitt has sung in a punk rock band, managed an independent music store, studied martial arts since the age of 8, and consistently denies rumors that have linked him to the Justice League of America. He holds three degrees, including a Masters from Seton Hill University's Writing Popular Fiction program and teaches creative writing at the college level.

Go to his MySpace if you wish to stalk him.

Wednesday, April 04, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Eugie Foster

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketEugie Foster

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Yes! Coffee with plenty of sweetener and milk, although I've been trying to kick the java habit on and off for years. Loose leaf tea--green, white, or herbal--never bagged; I'm an utter tea snob. And milk with cookies. Or cake. Or pie.


4. What else can you do besides write?
Well, I can edit, but I'm not sure if that counts as "besides write." Um, I can also program in COBOL, sew stuffed animals, and run experiments on children. That last one is less "mwa ha ha haa" and more to do with my MA in Developmental Psychology than it sounds. Really. And I can also give well-informed advice on how to raise a pet skunk.


5. Who are you reading right now?
Uglies by Scott Westerfeld, House Bill 227 of the Georgia General Assembly (for my day job, I'm a legal editor for the GGA), and slush for The Town Drunk.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
Everywhere! I get a lot of inspiration from fairy tales, folklore, and myths; I've loved them since I was old enough to be read to. Hobkin, my pet skunk, is a wealth of inspiration too; his antics have been the basis of several of my stories. I also find stories and see characters every day around me--at work, at home, on the MARTA train during my daily commute, on the news. The world's full of stories and me with not enough time to write them.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
Fresh cherries and salt and vinegar potato chips. Not necessarily at the same time . . .


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Afraid not, unless you count climbing the several flights of stairs at the Georgia state capitol every day to get to my office. I used to dance (ballet, modern, ballroom, and belly) and do karate, and I enjoyed yoga when I did it regularly, but I have always had zero interest in sports. Less than zero, negative twelve interest. And while I keep meaning to get back into yoga or learn Tai Chi, I never seem to manage it.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?

15. Do you still watch cartoons?
You betcha! Both the Saturday morning variety, like Teen Titans and Foster's Home for Imaginary Friends, and the Sunday evening kind--The Simpsons, Futurama, The Family Guy. I never outgrew cartoons. I hope I never do.


Eugie Foster grew up in the Midwest, although she calls home a mildly haunted, fey-infested house in Metro Atlanta that she shares with her husband, Matthew, and her pet skunk, Hobkin.

After receiving her Master of Arts degree in Developmental Psychology, she retired from academia and became a corporate computer drone. When her company asked her to leave the phantoms and fairies in the South and return to the dead-cold lands of the Midwest, she said "no" and retreated to her library to pen flights of fancy.

Her fiction has received the 2002 Phobos Award; been translated into Greek, Hungarian, Polish, and French; and been nominated for the British Fantasy, Southeastern Science Fiction, Parsec, and Pushcart Awards.

She's also the Managing Editor and a fiction reviewer for Tangent, the Editor/Director of the Daily Dragon, and the Assistant Managing Editor for The Town Drunk.

She is represented by literary agent William Reiss of John Hawkins & Associates, Inc., and is a voting member of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA), the non-profit writers organization founded by Damon Knight in 1965 and presenter of the Nebula awards.

She also keeps a LiveJournal Weblog where she indulges in self-absorbed musings and documents her writing progress. Her story "Mistress Fortune Favors the Unlucky" will be in the Fantasist Enterprises' anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy out this month.
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Tuesday, April 03, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Mike Brendan

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMichael Brendan

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Tea. Definitely tea. However that don't cut if I got some of my Mom's chocolate chip cookies.


4. What else can you do besides write?
I've studied martial arts and fencing for a total of nine years before a knee injury last October left me on the sidelines. I can safely say that after that long a study there's a lot there I don't know. I also paint miniatures when I have the time, and in 2007 I'll be trying my hand as a pewtersmith making them.


5. Who are you reading right now?
I'm reading Robert Ludlum's The Bourne Identity. The theme of finding one's identity/purpose is part of what I'm doing with my current project (an SF/Mystery novel) but the writing itself has been falling flat.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?

11. What kind of music speaks to you?
It depends on the mood. Most of the time I listen to rock or metal or Primus (which deserves its own category), but I also love The Chieftans and Wolmegut (the German equivalent). I wrote a death scene while listening to "It Happens All the Time" by Cold, and the emotion of the scene hit me in the gut. I had to stop for ten minutes because I was crying.


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I do a thumbnail sketch of five critical scenes the book has to have, and then a few I'd like to see. I don't outline until I'm about halfway through, simply because there's elements to the story I haven't thought of yet.


13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
I've been leaning towards transhumanism when I write SF, so I guess that would include Peter F. Hamilton and Joe Haldeman. Ursula K. LeGuin ranks up there too. Her ability to create such tangible characters makes her required reading in my book.


15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Mike Brendan is making his debut in Fanasist Enterprises' Anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy with the story "No Shit, There We Were."

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He graduated with an M.A. from Seton Hill's Writing Popular Fiction program and decided he damn well better do something with it. When not skewering a genre, he also writes more serious work in both fantasy and science-fiction. Mike is a lifelong resident of Pittsburgh, and a part time action hero.

Monday, April 02, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - W. H. Horner

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketW. H. Horner

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
4. What else can you do besides write?

5. Who are you reading right now?
I'm always reading several things at once. A great deal of my reading time is taken up by submissions, either short stories for anthologies or novels or comic book pitches that I've requested from authors I know. I'm an avid reader of comic books, so every week I have new issues of my favorites that I have to read. I'm a fan of Warren Ellis, Garth Ennis, and Neil Gaiman, so whatever comic they have out, I'm usually following it. And, right now, I'm also reading Sabriel by Garth Nix. It's been on my bookshelf for years and a friend of mine who is a non-fantasy reader just devoured the series, so I thought it was time to read it.


6. Pop culture or academia?
Mostly pop culture, but I do tend to head towards academia and literary fiction from time to time. For instance, I jumped at the most recent issue of Tin House due to an essay on the nature of the novel by Milan Kundera.

One trend I've noticed in my Fantastical Visions anthology series is that the stories I pick to be the winners of the contest tend to be a bit more on the literary end of fantasy. I've accepted stories from Murray J. D. Leeder a few times now (Cloaked in Shadow, Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy, Sails & Sorcery, and Blood & Devotion)

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCover Art by Chris Chua

and, for the most part, the shorts that I've picked from him are a far cry from the stuff he's written for Wizards of the Coast. Not that I don't enjoy a light Forgotten Realms novel every now and then . . . but the shorts he's sent me tend towards a slightly more literary feel--that still evokes a great sense of magic and wonder. I'm prodding him to develop the style and craft for a novel, but I know his Ph.D. candidacy is taking a lot of his time.


7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
My inspiration comes from all over the place. We really are receptacles for everything we see, hear, smell, taste, and touch everyday. Every novel we read, every newspaper we page through, every song we hear, every movie we watch . . . every relationship we have, every conversation we take part in . . . it's all there in our subconscious. A wonderful stew of possibility just waiting for a ladle to come along and scoop up a bowlful. My stories and characters tend to come to me from this subconscious collection of possibility in my dreams, both sleeping and day dreams. If I allow myself to be still and quiet, and just let my brain wander around, something will come to my attention, begging to be written.


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
I have trained in Tai Chi Chuan for two years and in Haidong Gumdo, a Korean sword-art, for about a year. Though I played the requisite little league baseball when I was a kid, I never really enjoyed team sports, and I wish I had discovered martial arts a long time ago. Studying Tai Chi has helped me develop an internal calm and focus that I did not have before, as well as assisted me in being more aware of my body--posture and breathing, especially. Haidong Gumdo has given me more discipline and increased my physical strength and endurance. All of which makes me a more effective writer and editor, especially thanks to the increased focus and discipline.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I never outlined until I had to do it for the Master's program at Seton Hill. Since then I've sort of slacked off on the outlines, but I still write down a few loose notes that block out some of the emotional beats I'm going for. If you really stretched the definition of an outline, I guess that could fit.


13. Celebrity crush.
I'm cheating on this one. I've never been one to crush on celebrities. I don't feel that most celebrities are particularly special. Yes, they probably have some kind of talent that got them noticed, but honestly, they are just people like you or me--the difference being that their lives ended up taking a particularly public direction.


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

W. H. Horner is Publisher and Editor-in-Chief of Fantasist Enterprises, an independent publisher of illustrated fantasy and horror, and of FE Comics, an upcoming line of fantasy and horror comic books and graphic novels.

William, a native of Wilmington, DE, is surrounded by hundreds of books and magazines, as well as a handful of felines. He earned his Master's in Writing Popular Fiction from Seton Hill University in 2006. While not working on FE projects, William does freelance fiction editing and plays with words of his own.

Sunday, April 01, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - WEEK 8 - BASH DOWN THE DOOR

This week HEIDI'S PICK SIX will feature six interviews instead of the usual three.

You will get to meet some of the contributors to Fantasist Enterprises' latest anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Badguy.
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Here is the line up:
Monday - W. H. Horner / editor
Tuesday - Michael Brendan / Science Fiction and Fantasy
Wednesday - Eugie Foster / Horror, Fantasy, and Science Fiction
Thursday - A. G. Devitt / Fantasy
Friday - Susan Sielinski / Fantasy
Saturday - Jeremy Yoder / Fantasy


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Writers' News

#1: My story, "The Islands of Hope" is scheduled to appear in Sails & Sorcery: Nautical Tales of Fantasy, published by Fantasist Enterprises edited by W. H. Horner.

#2: Anne Harris is serializing her first novel The Nature of Smoke on her blog Mangaloid.

#3: Sherry D. Ramsey of Scriptorium has an interview with M. D. Benoit about her new novel Synergy.



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