Tuesday, July 31, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Lindsey Duncan

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLindsey Duncan

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
The answer to this question is almost invariably, “One of the ones I’m writing now.” I’m currently working on editing a novel project, but it’s almost as hard to pick between the three principals as it would be to choose between children. I’m particularly attached to Kit because I enjoy capable adolescent characters – a young person who isn’t a “whiny teen” or a “wise child,” competent and grounded while still being, yes, a kid – and I like to think she fits the bill. At fifteen, Kit is the central protagonist in a (more or less) contemporary world, and it is her search for her mother’s killer that draws in the other two characters. She is hyper-emotional, sarcastic and less cynical than she thinks she is, but she’s also resourceful, loyal and unusually grounded. This being a supernatural story, the otherwise modern teen gets a crash-course in the mystical from water-witch Chailyn – who has the small handicap of being raised solely amongst a coven of sorcerers. Maybe most writers have done a story where a modern person tries to explain the real world to an outsider, but I had a blast with Kit’s take.


2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
My main “schtick” outside of writing is that I perform and teach the traditional lever harp. The ornate gold-columned harp you’ve seen in orchestras is the pedal harp and is actually a newer invention. (For those of you familiar with music theory, the levers or pedals on a harp provide the ability to play sharps and flats.) My specialty is Celtic music, and I play at least one piece of music from all seven Celtic lands: Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Galicia (Spain), Brittany (France), Isle of Man and Cornwall. My obsession is with the Welsh music, but I’ve also been known to play Renaissance music, popular tunes, and just whatever catches my fancy.

I teach a number of beginning students with ages ranging from nine to too-old-to-ask and also help to coordinate a local harp circle. I play weddings, parties and stage-sets – with the latter, I also accompany myself singing. Learning further repertoire in the Welsh language (that is, songs in Welsh) is a goal of mine.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
I have a lot of trouble with argument scenes where the dialogue has to lead to a revelation or crisis. The jealous argument in "Currents and Clockwork" is one, but I remember being completely stumped in a novel project. I knew the result I wanted and it was fitting with the characters, but I could not work out the precise exchanges of dialogue to get from point A to point F. In the end, I had to tweak a few prior conversations to provide some of the intermediary links. This is something that flummoxes me a lot. The sense of causality is there, but the specifics throw the chain off unless I sit down and rework extensively as I write. I can’t even finish a rough draft with “here there be links,” either – has to be done thoroughly or not at all.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
Historical trivia – the more bizarre, the better – half-remembered dreams, randomly generated story pieces, philosophical what-ifs, writing exercises allowed to turn cartwheels, and sometimes even bits of dialogue. One of my favorite first lines came from a moment in frustration in playing a buggy computer RPG, where I could not get the confrontation with an evil priest to trigger. In frustration, I shouted at the screen, “Stop blessing me, you’re the villain,” and that, in a new context, became my main character’s first speech in a tongue-in-cheek short story. Most often, my ideas come together from a mish-mash of sources, rarely one thing but a variety of mostly unrelated concepts coming together at the same time.


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Let me put it this way. I was part of a Renaissance song-and-dance troupe in my early teens, before I discovered the harp. The one thing that convinced me to keep playing the recorder (an instrument I generally disliked) was the fact that if I was not a musician, I would have to dance.

My large motor coordination has not improved since. However, I power-walk daily and keep in shape – walking in a straight line is pretty simple, all in all. I do a lot of my plotting on walks.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
Both … more or less simultaneously. When I try not to predetermine the direction my stories are heading in, I fail miserably. I instinctively build a fluid outline in my head, populated by images, bits of dialogue, sensations, and a rough causal link between most of them. This beast bounces around in my brain even when I’m far away from the computer, developing nuances and filling in gaps in a not-always-linear fashion. However, at the same time, the act of putting fingers to keys often brings out threads that I didn’t initially intend and creates images in a way I hadn’t expected.

Usually the outline remains but acquires more and sometimes surprising detail the more I write; occasionally, I find myself diverted in a different direction – though this happens far more often with novel projects. I most often use typed outlines when I am balancing multiple plots and trying to make sure that everything happens within a reasonable span of time(s) – and then my notes tend to be sparse. My internal outline remains far more complex.

I think my subconscious possibly builds a lot more of an outline than it ever bothers telling *me* about, because I often find myself inserting things on the fly that fit in perfectly as I continue. Conversely, sometimes I find that the story “pulls” away from a plot-point I was heading for, and when I go back to examine the threads that brought me there, I realize that I was aiming in a different direction for a while.


13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Lindsey Duncan is a life-long writer with short fiction and poetry in several speculative fiction publications. She also performs and teaches Celtic harp, and feels that music and language are inextricably linked. She lives in the Cincinnati, Ohio area and is a student at Indiana University, working on a self-designed major focusing on human belief systems. The world of "Currents and Clockwork", her story in the Fantasist Enterprises' anthology Sails and Sorcery:Tales of Nautical Fantasy, is also the setting for one of her novel projects.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSails and Sorcery: Tales of Nautical Fantasy

Monday, July 30, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Angeline Hawkes

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketAngeline Hawkes

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
My favorite character so far, is Kabar of El Hazzar. That's probably why I now have an entire series about him. He's fun to write. So many adventures and monsters to be slain! He's this brawny, hulking barbarian who can kill bad things and do things I can never do. Exotic locations, mythological beasts, awesome weapons! He always has so much fun! I love living through Kabar!


2. Tell me about your travels.
Hmmm, I've been to Canada, Mexico, England, and through most of the United States, with the exception of the very deep South. I wish I was on the beach in Cancun, Mexico right now!


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
I'm an avid seamstress. I quilt..a lot. I also enjoy sewing doll clothes and sell them on ebay occasionally.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
I don't believe I've written that yet, because I normally don't have trouble writing scenes regardless of what it involves. Scenes aren't tough if they're vital to the plot. Emotion, action, whatever it is that needs to be incorporated must be written if it is necessary to advance the story. I remove my personal self from the mechanics and write what has to be written.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
I'm very visually stimulated. Fantasy artwork inspires a lot of my stories. History is a huge influence in my tales as well.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I always outline. The stories sometimes don't stick to the outlines, but I always leave wiggle room in the outline for the story to do something on its own that I didn't count on when I was in the concept stages.


13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Angeline Hawkes received her B.A. in Composite English Language Arts in 1991 from East Texas State University where she was a member of Sigma Tau Delta [English Honor Society]. She is a former secondary education teacher [British Literature, English, Journalism, Speech Communications, and Reading].

Angeline resides in Texas with her husband, writer Christopher Fulbright, and is a member of the Horror Writer’s Association. Her fiction crosses many genres but primarily Angeline writes Horror, Fantasy and Speculative fiction.

Kabar makes another appearance in her story Balaam's Bones: A Tale of the barbarian Kabar of El Hazzar as part of the new Fantasist Enterprises' anthology Sails and Sorcery: Tales of Nautical Fantasy.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSails and Sorcery: Tales of Nautical Fantasy

Sunday, July 29, 2007

Friday, July 27, 2007

HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Catherine Mulvany

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCatherine Mulvany

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Hands down it's Ian MacPherson from Run No More. A) He's a Scot. B) He's a cat burglar. C) He looks great in a tux. And D) Did I mention that he's a Scot? Think a young Sean Connery. Same voice. Same eyebrows.


2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Diet Pepsi or water.


4. What else can you do besides write?

5. Who are you reading right now?
Jim Butcher. My daughter sent me Storm Front, Book One of The Dresden Files.


6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
I sweated blood over the final scene of Something Wicked, the vampire book that comes out at the end of July. I rewrote it--totally rewrote as in completely different scenes--four times. The problem was, I needed to do the happily-ever-after thing plus have closing circle back to the themes and imagery of the opening. The first three attempts did that, but they were predictable. The final version has a spark the others lacked, but man, was it ever a torturous journey!


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?

9. Food you could eat everyday.
Strawberries, Dove chocolates, mesquite smoked turkey, and cheddar cheese, not necessarily in that order.


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
Agatha Christie, Edgar Allen Poe, J.D. Salinger, Mary Stewart, Elisabeth
Ogilvie, Rumer Godden, Mark Twain, Tony Hillerman, Robert Crais, and
Jennifer Crusie


15. Do you still watch cartoons?


Catherine Mulvany’s life is a fairy tale. Okay, a fractured fairy tale. At age eleven she fell hopelessly in love with a little town in eastern Oregon. With a population under fifty—counting the cats and dogs—the town didn’t even qualify as one-horse, but the place had character. Character and an abundance of arkayesses.

Never heard of an arkayess? Neither had Catherine. But on the first day of her visit, she became intimately acquainted with one particularly gruesome member of this species—also known as the road-killed snake. Arkayess. RKS. Road-killed snake. Get it?

She did. The hard way.

Catherine was walking along a side street, minding her own business, when the orneriest boy in town came riding down the road on his bike, swinging a dead snake like a lariat. “You’d better run, kid,” he yelled. “I’m gonna wrap this arkayess around your leg!”

She ran.

He followed. (Are you getting that whole fairy tale connection? Knight on a white charger equals boy on a bike?)

When he got close enough, he took aim, then let that snake fly. It cartwheeled through the air with deadly accuracy to coil itself around her bare leg.

The boy was almost as shocked as Catherine; he hadn’t expected to hit his target. So to make it up to her, he proposed...and it only took him nine years to do it. She accepted, of course, and they’ve lived happily ever after in their very own castle.

All right. So it’s really a three-bedroom ranch house, but it has an irrigation ditch out back, and that’s practically a moat, right?

Thursday, July 26, 2007

Seton Hill June 2007 Residency Series - The Graduation

The Graduation

Congratulations!

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSabrina Naples, Melissa Doll, K. Ceres Wright, Rachael Pruitt, Johanna L. Gribble, and Jason Jack Miller

There are lots and lots of photos to follow.

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Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDr. Lee Tobin McClain

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMelissa Doll gives the prayer.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller delivers the commencement speech.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketK. Ceres Wright receives her hood from Dr. Michael A. Arnzen and Dr. Albert Wendland

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJohanna L. Gribble

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketRachael Pruitt

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMike Mehalek and Michael Arnzen

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSabrina Naples and Jason Jack Miller

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketRachael Pruitt and Timons Esaias

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSabrina Naples and family

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller and Kristi Gutknecht

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJohanna L. Gribble and sister

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHeidi Ruby Miller and Jason Jack Miller

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMichael A. Arnzen, Jason Jack Miller, and Chun Lee

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller and Timons Esaias

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHeidi Ruby Miller, Jason Jack Miller, and Johanna L. Gribble

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller and the Miller family

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller and the Ruby family

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketBACK - Lee Tobin McClain; NEXT - Timons Esaias, Johanna L. Gribble, and Rachael Pruitt; FRONT - Michael A. Arnzen, K. Ceres Wright, Sabrina Naples, Kristi Gutknecht, Jason Jack Miller, and Albert Wendland


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HEIDI'S PICK SIX - Adele Cosgrove-Bray

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketAdele Cosgrove-Bray

HEIDI'S PICK SIX

1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
At the moment, that would have to be Rowan. He’s attending college right now, and is living with his Aunt Lydia. You can meet them both in "Seagull Inn," a ghost story which will appear in Ruins, an anthology due to be published this summer by Hadley Rille Books. He also appears anonymously in a very short story, "Shell Boy," which isn’t available anywhere yet, and is the main character in my next novel.

Rowan is typical of many young adults in that he’s not quite sure what he wants to do with his life. He’s known some awful times but, thanks to Lydia, his life is stable right now. That’s bound to change in the novel, of course – but I won’t give anything away.


2. Tell me about your travels.
3. Coffee, tea, or milk?

4. What else can you do besides write?
Photography is a big interest. It’s due to this interest that I met my husband, Richard. We were working as photographers for Conservation Practise, making a visual record of listed buildings and monuments around Liverpool, and taking photos for the company magazine. Richard opened his own tattoo studio in 1993, but we still pursue our photography and have a number of different cameras. We intend to convert the attic for use as a darkroom eventually. All the necessary equipment is ready and waiting; we just need to make the attic light-tight – and find the time.

Pottery is another interest. I worked for Pretty Ugly Pottery when they had a large place by the docks in Liverpool. As a tour guide, I’d lead international groups of tourists or schoolchildren around the production area and explain how we made the famous Ugly Mugs, before taking them into the Have-A-Go area where they’d attempt to decorate a mug of their own. When there were no tours, I’d be busy making the faces on Ugly Mugs or on large tankards which required a more complex caricature. I’ve also completed college classes in pottery, which I thoroughly enjoyed.

Fine Art painting interests me; I usually paint portraits in oils, though I sketch in ink and watercolours. I went to art school, but I don’t paint anything like as often as I used to. Most of my creative energy is focussed on writing, which is also the reason why I’ve not done any patchwork or embroidery recently.

Genealogy is another pursuit. I’m the custodian of my family’s genealogical records, having been handed a mass of documents, certificates and notations acquired and developed by an elderly family member. It’s taken me many months just to create some kind of order from the mass of files and folders and plastic bags stuffed with data. My father’s family name can be traced back to 11th century Norman England, while my mother’s family allegedly has its origins with the Picts.


5. Who are you reading right now?
I’ve literally just begun reading From the Ashes of Angels by Andrew Collins, and the last book I read was Asne Seirstad’s The Bookseller of Kabul, which made fascinating reading and yet was depressing also, simply because of the awful poverty and oppression of the Afghan way of life.

I’m always reading; on average, I get through forty books every year. I’ve always been an avid reader. I learned how to read at the age of four and have never stopped since.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
Ancient history and mythology have interested me since early childhood. I’m fortunate enough to live in an area rich with history – Celts, Vikings, Romans and Normans have all settled here, in the Wirral Peninsula in Cheshire, England. Most of my short stories are set here, such as A Wirral Otherkin Trilogy, which is available to buy through Amazon.com, which uses a combination of local history and Celtic folklore as a source for ideas.

My unpublished novel,
Tamsin is set in the district of Aigburth in Liverpool, which is on the opposite side of the River Mersey from Wirral. Tamsin’s description of the area around Lark Lane comes from my own experience of living there. I regularly attended the craft fairs which she visits, and I know Sefton Park and its Victorian Palm House and the boating lake well. Liverpool is such a dynamic city, with a vast maritime history. It once rivalled London to become the capital of England. These-days, Liverpool is described as Europe’s biggest building site, as the skyline is crammed with numerous massive cranes, and there are fascinating new buildings springing up all over the city – Victorian and Georgian architecture rubbing shoulders with state-of-the-art modernity. I love the tension and interaction between the ancient and the new. This can be found in my writing, too.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
With short stories, I have absolutely no idea what’s going to happen when I begin writing them. I’ll start off with a vague idea for a character, or with a phrase or loosely-defined initial situation, and then just see what flows into my imagination.

My first two novels were written to detailed chapter plans. Maybe this is why they’re best left on the shelf and labelled “Learning Experience”. Or maybe one day I’ll find an editor brave enough to wade through them – but probably not!

I find that if I plan things too much, I get bored with the story because I know it already. Ideas are very attractive to me, and if I’ve already explored the idea through the creation of a plan then I become too hungry for the next writing idea. With
Tamsin, I began by using creative visualisation with the main characters, imagining scenarios for them and then pasting this onto outline of what I wanted the novel to say.


13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
Is this where I’m supposed to attempt to make myself sound terribly clever by twittering about Shakespeare and Milton? Maybe I should just skip to question 15?!!

Two of my favourite childhood books were Jonathon Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach, and Born Free by Joy Adamson. I read those till the ink wore thin, and then I discovered Dennis Wheatley’s novels along with Hammer films. One long summer, in my mid-teens, was devoted to the seemingly mandatory study of all of JR Tolkien’s writings, and then for many years after that I didn’t read fiction at all.

The languid mood of Evelyn Waugh’s Brideshead Revisited caught my imagination, and yet I also enjoyed the theme of Edward Bulwer Lytton’s Zanoni. Without realising it at the time, these ideas would come to play a part in my own writings.

I absolutely have to acknowledge Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles as an important inspiration, as it was this author’s imagination and use of language which inspired me to start writing fiction. I’d already had poems and a series of non-fiction articles about dream analysis published by then, but I’d not considered taking writing seriously until this point.

15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Folklore, mystery and the local history of Wirral and Liverpool create a unique blend of Dark Fantasy tales by Adele Cosgrove-Bray.

Adele began writing poetry at the age of fourteen, and at seventeen became a member of Leigh Writers’ Workshop, when her first poem plus a humorous small article were published in Pipes of Pan. Adele went on to write and illustrate a monthly dream analysis column for Your Future magazine under the pseudonym of Niamh Koo. Adele self-published a quarterly music fanzine called Smokin’ Dragon for four years before becoming far more interested in writing fiction. She was elected Chair for Riverside Writers in 2003, a post she still holds. She is also a member of Wirral Writers Inc.

Adele was educated at Golborne High School and Leigh Technical College in Lancashire, then later at the City of Liverpool Community College (Art & Design Faculty) and also at that same college’s Riversdale Campus (Pottery Studio).

Adele has worked as an editor for The Birchwood Guidebook, a health promotion officer for South Sefton Health Authority, a library assistant at the Religion & Philosophy Library at Liverpool City Libraries, a photographer for Conservation Practice, a tarot card reader, and as a potter and tour guide for Pretty Ugly Pottery.

She has lived on the Wirral peninsula in Cheshire since the Millennium, where she writes full-time and shares life with her husband Richard, who opened his own tattoo studio in Liverpool city centre in 1993.

Wednesday, July 25, 2007

Seton Hill June 2007 Residency Series - The Retreat

Since I graduated from Seton Hill this past January, this was my first official WPF Alumni Retreat. It was wonderful.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDeanna Lepsch

IN YOUR RIGHT MIND - JUNE 22-24, 2007

Guest Speaker - Michael Bracken
Guest Agent - Jennifer Jackson of Donald Maass Agency

Friday:
Registration and Pitch Sessions
Elaine Ervin - Website Building and Blogging for Writers
Peer Critique Sessions
Ron Edison - Hearing with Your Ears
Carmine DeYoung - Techniques for a Successful Author Visit


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketRon Edison and Rhonda Mason

Saturday:
Jennifer Jackson - Recipe for a Five Star Agent
Heidi Ruby Miller - Viral Networking
Michael Bracken - The Three Keys to Getting Published
Patrick Picciarelli - How to Write a Book Proposal
Roundtable Discussion - Shelley Bates, Sally Bosco, Michael Bracken, Diana Dru Botsford, Carmine DeYoung, Ron Edison, Elaine Ervin, Jennifer Jackson, Heidi Ruby Miller, Patrick Picciarelli

Catherine Asaro Presentation


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketHeidi Ruby Miller, Mary SanGiovanni, and Adam SanGiovanni

Sunday:
Shelley Bates - Writing for More Than One Market
Sally Bosco - How to Write Manga
Diana Dru Botsford - The Art & Business of Adaptation for the Visual Medium
Business Meeting


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJill Stevens, Donna Munroe, and Elaine Ervin

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMike Brendan

And, of course, the alums still participated in the residency social events so it was like a huge reunion for everyone.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketChun Lee and Mike Mehalek

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketRon Edison and Shara Saunsaucie

The WPF Retreat is held annually and open to all writers, noy just those who graduated from Seton Hill. Next year there's talk of extending the retreat by a day for a Thursday writers' lock in. For more information you can visit the Seton Hill Alumni site or use the follwoign contact information:

WPF Reunion/Retreat
Mary Ross Cox
Seton Hill University
Seton Hill Drive
Greensburg, PA 15601-1599
724/830-1027
cox@setonhill.edu
FAX: 724/830-1858


Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMarge Burke, Ron Shafer, and Milt Anderson


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Monday, July 23, 2007

Seton Hill June 2007 Residency Series - The Booksigning

This post is the shortest of the series and is called The Booksigning.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLee Tobin McClain, Lawrence C. Connolly, Mike Brendan, Christe Cabrallo, A. G. Devitt, and Tobias Buckell

Every June when the Seton Hill WPF summer residency coincides with the WPF Alumni Retreat, we have more than one hundred authors on that beautiful campus. So of course, there is always a massive booksigning on the weekend at the Barnes and Noble in Greensburg, PA.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

The signing this year included authors like Michael A. Arnzen, Shelley Bates, Sally Bosco, Mike Brendan, Tobias Buckell, Christe M. Callabro, Lawrence C. Connolly, A. G. Devitt, Alexa Grave, Anne Harris,, W. H. Horner, Scott A. Johnson, Lee Tobin McClain, Rhonda Mason, Heidi Ruby Miller, Jason Jack Miller, Donna Munroe, and Patrick Picciarelli. Many apologies if I forgot anyone.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketShelley Bates, Sally Bosco, and Heidi Ruby Miller

W. H. Horner brought some great promotional pins (like the one I'm wearing in the previous picture) for the Sails and Sorcery: Tales of Nautical Fantasy anthology coming out next month and the debut of FE Comics in December with The Fracture, a comic by Chun Lee and Diana Dru Botsford.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket


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HEIDI'S PICK SIX - WEEK 23

This week's line up at ambasadora includes:

Wednesday - Adele Cosgrove-Bray / Dark Fantasy

Friday - Catherine Mulvany / Romantic Suspense and Paranormal Romance


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Saturday, July 21, 2007

100th Submission

I just sent in my 100th submission for the year. This one was a SF poem titled "Misplaced my keys." It went out via email to Aberrant Dreams.

I don't normally post my submissions, but I thought this was a great milestone. I have my former Seton Hill mentor, Tobias Buckell, to thank for my submission frenzy. He submits at least 150 works each year.

I'm going for 151, Toby!


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Seton Hill June 2007 Residency Series - The Residency

This series is The Residency.

It has more photos than thoughts, but it's no less entertaining. After five of my own residencies as a Seton Hill WPF student, I was able to observe the process as a grad this June. It was still just as incredible.
Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMike Mehalek

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket

During the day the 80 plus graduate students attend two sets of three hour modules which not only discuss craft, but also offer insights into the business aspect of publishing to better prepare graduates for a writing life after Seton Hill. At any one time there are four simultaneous sessions happening at once. Choosing can sometimes be heart-breaking.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMatt Donahue and Heidi Ruby Miller

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The mentors come from diverse writing backgrounds and genres. I believe this diversity is one of the strengths of the WPF Program because though I chose the SF track, I learned so much from and welcomed the perspective of those teaching about and writing Romance, Mystery, YA, Children's, Horror, Fantasy, and Mainstream. It made me a more well-rounded writer and reader; but, of course, a graduate program should challenge what you think you know about everything.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketLeslie Davis Guccione

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketSabrina Naples consulting with Timons Esaias

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDr. Michael A. Arnzen

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDiane Turnshek

Graduating students must also teach a module during their final residency as part of their graduation requirements. This is wonderful practice and a resume point for future speaking engagements at conventions, conferences, universities, local organizations, etc. That last residency is even busier than the typical fifteen to sixteen-hour days of a normal residency, but so rewarding.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketDr. Albert Wendland introducing Jason Jack Miller for the Graduate Teaching Module

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketJason Jack Miller during his teaching module on Writing Query Letters

And because we work so hard during the day, we have lots of fun at night. Socializing and networking is an important aspect of the program. This community of writers at all levels inspires me, offers me advice and perspective, consoles me, apprises me of events and marketing news, and reminds me that I'm not alone as a writer. Someone is either going through what I am, already went through it, or is about to go through it. I can't tell you how reassuring that is.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketK. Ceres Wright, Rachael Pruitt, and Johanna L. Gribble

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketChun Lee and Danielle Hinesly at this year's Pirate-themed Wine Social

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketPatricia Tighe, Melissa Doll, and Monica Spence

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketMarcus Christian, Mike Mehalek, Heidi Ruby Miller, and Jason Jack Miller


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