Sunday, August 28, 2011

HEIDI'S PICK SIX: April Grey

HEIDI'S PICK SIX


April Grey


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
My favorites have to be from the novel, Chasing The Trickster, which is coming out this fall from Eternal Press. Although I've written a lot of short stories and several novels, these characters were the ones who kept grabbing me and bringing me back to working on their story. I have a couple of other characters who do that, but Nina, Pascal and Joe have been incredibly forceful. Not to sound like a total nut, but sometimes I think I see one or another of them on the street or in the subway. They just don't give up on me.


2. Tell me about your travels.
Stratford, Montreal, Quebec and the Ile d'Orleans in Canada. I've been to Nantucket, all over Cape Cod, Boston, Salem, and Plymouth, Mass. I grew up in NYS so have been to places all over there as well as CT and NJ. (I love Cape May!) And we go to the Catskills every summer. I've been up and down the Eastern seaboard all the way down to Key West, and have gone cross country: Austin TX, (family) New Orleans, Sante Fe, the Grand Canyon, Yosemite, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle. I lived three years in St. Andrews, Scotland and visited the Hebrides (waves to Lismore), Dundee and Glasgow. In England: the Lake District, London, and York. I've been to Paris, France, Amsterdam, Holland and Aachen, Germany. Funny, I don't think of myself as a traveler. I don't even drive a car, but my mom was a nomad in her former life and took us everywhere.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Decaf coffee and lots of it.


4. What else can you do besides write?
In my earlier life I was a theatre person (acting, directing, producing, costuming, being a literary manager) and a paralegal. I'm a wife of 18 years and mom to a 14 year old son. I like sewing and take art classes in quilting, journaling and mixed media. My art quilts are part of a group show right now here in NYC.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
A mom tries to save the lives of her husband and child, and fails.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
My life. I never know it at the time, though. Usually a couple of years afterwards I say, OMG, that's why I wrote it? Sort of like a booby trap in a pretty box with bows and ribbons.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
15. Do you still watch cartoons?

April Grey's first novel Chasing the Trickster will be out this November from Eternal Press. In honor of this event she has produced a collection of her previously published short stories, "The Fairy Cake Bake Shoppe and 13 other Weird Tales." Before turning to writing she was a theatre professional and a paralegal. She currently teaches in NYC and does art quilts in her spare time. She lives with her husband and son. Find her online at:

WEBSITE: www.aprilgreywrites.com
BLOG: www.aprilgrey.blogspot.com
SMASHWORDS: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/69034
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001944660314

Thursday, August 25, 2011

HEIDI'S PICK SIX: Jacob Henry Orloff

HEIDI'S PICK SIX


Jacob Henry Orloff


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?

2. Tell me about your travels.
I’ve had the opportunity to visit some of the most beautiful locations on this planet. Wales was especially lovely and definitely my favorite place to vacation. (Hello Tracy, Mez, Dot, Richard). Recently, I took a trip to Oregon with my girlfriend, Kayla. We stayed mostly in the Portland area, and it was absolutely wonderful. I was highly impressed by the thriving arts community there and I could get lost in Powell’s Books for hours. The scenery was breathtaking. Aside from that, I’ve been to Vegas twice, Texas, Colorado, Utah, and all the states in between. I’m hoping to visit the East Coast more, namely Florida.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Coffee is most certainly my morning drink on those rare occasions that I’m actually awake before noon. I don’t drink it very often during the summer. It’s mostly an autumn and winter drink for me. Tea is good all year. Currently, I’m drinking a blend of Rooibos Tropica and Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearls purchased from the local tea shop. Milk will always go with cookies.


4. What else can you do besides write?

5.Who are you reading right now?
Hell House by Richard Matheson and his collection, Nightmare at 20,000 Feet. I always return to Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, though. Philip K. Dick can’t be beat when I’m in the mood for sci-fi and I’ll always read anything by my friend and collaborator, W.H. Pugmire.


6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
I think the most terrifying aspect of the Horror art form is not so much in the subject matter, but in the implications. The fact that the reader to a certain degree can relate subconsciously to the circumstances of a horror story is what truly scares me. So whether it’s that strange, primal feeling you get when you look upon a full moon, or the skeletons in your closet banging on the door to get out, in some capacity we are all horror stories. I only need to look into my soul to find inspiration and it generally comes in the form of dreams, or nightmares.


9. Food you could eat every day.
I don’t believe Olive Garden could ever possibly get old, but I could probably eat Gates BBQ every day and be completely comfortable with that. If we’re basing this off my current budget, it’d be Ramen. I used to have frequent Mac Attacks, but I’ve since phased McDonald’s out of my diet.


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?
12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
H.P. Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard, Philip K. Dick, and Richard Matheson.


15. Do you still watch cartoons?

Jacob Henry Orloff is a writer of dark fiction. Dwelling mostly in the genre of Horror, he occasionally branches out to the areas of Science Fiction and Fantasy. His stories have appeared in several anthologies released by Pill Hill Press. Currently he resides in the shadowed plains of the Midwest and is attending the local university in pursuit of an English degree with a Creative Writing emphasis. Find him online at http://jhorloff.wordpress.com.

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

HEIDI'S PICK SIX: Patti Roberts

HEIDI'S PICK SIX


Patti Roberts


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
Oh my god, that is impossible. That is like asking a mother to chose a favourite. I can’t do it. But I will say that I like writing for Angela and Abaddon.A


2. Tell me about your travels.
I travel a lot through Malaysia with my family when I was younger. I love Singapore and Penang.


3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Weak black tea, no sugar or milk. Coffee with milk no sugar.


4. What else can you do besides write?
Sing, dance, act, skydive and sailing. Well actually no. But I did go sailing every weekend when I was a kid. I sing in the shower. Dance in my dreams. Act-up every opportunity I get. Skydive, not a chance. I like the taking off and the landing part way to much to jump out of a perfectly good aircraft.


5. Who are you reading right now?
Justin Cronin – The Passage.


6. Pop culture or academia?
Pop


7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
None of them a tough. Some are more emotional tho that others.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
From within. Awake and asleep.


9. Food you could eat everyday.
Seafood! Pasta.


10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Not really.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?
Lots of different kinds. I like listening to the lyrics. Songs are short stories with music.


12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
Oh I am defiantly on the ride.


13. Celebrity crush.
Gerald Butler (my DR Sammy in the book) … and Aussie Alex O'Loughlin (Wade – in the book).


14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
There have been so many. So many great stories that have inspired in so many different ways.


15. Do you still watch cartoons?
Only if I have put them on for my friends children. Then I get sucked into them.


Patti Roberts: Location -- Cairns Queensland Australia.

On any given day you can usually find me sitting at my desk in front of my laptop pounding away at the keys writing another chapter in the Paradox series. That would be a run of the mill kinda day for me!

A packet of Cruskits and a water bottle, that is now at room temperature, is sitting on the desk beside me. There is also a mass of USB cables, notepads, bills to be paid, bills to be filed a bunch of pens and a printer that is forever running out of ink. Sound familiar?

On most days I have to remind myself to eat and drink. I should be thinner!!!

I am sure my housemates are very thankful that I still manage (usually at some ungodly hour) to bathe, brush my hair and clean my teeth.

I don't know about you. But I am usually mortified when visitors just pop around, only to find me sitting at my desk and still in my PJ's. I don't even want to broach the hair situation! Did I remember to put last nights dishes away???

Now, they say to be a good writer, you must read, read, read. Then read some more...

Thankfully, due to the invention of the electronic reader (I have a Kindle and love it) I get to read more these days. Correction. I have my Kindle read to me! The only thing is, I have so many great books on my Kindle that it is so hard to know where to start. So many choices.

A little more about me... And how you can contact me: http://theangelsarehere.wordpress.com/

Born in Brisbane Qld Australia.
Grew up in Darwin in the NT.
Now living in Cairns Qld.

You can see a book trailer for her novel Paradox here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IovcxyZTFuU

You can buy Paradox at Amazon

and at Smashwords.

Monday, August 22, 2011

HEIDI'S PICK SIX: Trent Zelazny

HEIDI'S PICK SIX


Trent Zelazny


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
I drink way too much coffee and have an odd fascination with milk. Being a recovering alcoholic, I’ve found insane amounts of caffeine have taken the place of liquor, and that’s just fine with me. I’d rather drink a pot of coffee than a fifth or handle of what I used to drink. Don’t ask about the milk. I really don’t know what that’s all about.


4. What else can you do besides write?
5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?
7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?

8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
My life, mostly. Flannery O’Connor said, "Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days." Very true, I think. Sadly, I’ve had many experiences since childhood, and many of them have not been good. Anything can inspire. An entire novel came to me while listening to an 80s pop song. Sometimes I read a book or see a movie and it spawns something. Or I overhear somebody say something and go into "What if?" mode. Very often I’ll get a sentence I like, and simply take it from there, curious to see what happens.


9. Food you could eat everyday.

10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
Basketball. Borderline obsessive basketball fan. I play, though not well. Get me in on a game and I promise you will have the absolute worst point guard on the face of the earth. The Phoenix Suns are my team, though I love the Celtics and the Miami Heat, too. Steve Nash, my favorite player, was a partial inspiration in my novella Shadowboxer. I should probably stop here and not say any more. Otherwise I may begin to analyze the entire last season, i.e. I’ll make myself look like an idiot, and I’ve already done plenty of that in my life.


11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
I never outline. I don’t understand how people make that work. A lot of people do, I’m not downing on it in any way, but any time I’ve tried the outline thing, it quickly turns into the actual piece, so for me an outline is more of an obstacle than a help. The one or two times I’ve actually completed an outline, I then never wrote the piece. To me, I had gotten the story out. In a way I’d already written it, and so, not wanting to write it again, it was on to the next story. I don’t take very many notes either, especially not in my first drafts. When I go through a second time I make little notes like "The suitcase is against the south wall, not the west wall" and things like that. For me, one of the joys of writing is the mental juggling. I love bouncing it all around in my head.


13. Celebrity crush.

14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?
Joe Lansdale is the biggest contemporary influence. His work just blows me away. He was the author who taught me most about technique, as well as how important it is to be honest in your work. David Goodis has probably influenced me the most in recent years. Brutally honest writing. I’ve read Shoot the Piano Player aka Down There about ten times, I think. Cornell Woolrich is another, especially his short stories. Same with Robert Bloch. Donald Westlake, Lawrence Block are two others, and of course my father. A poet disguised in science fiction.


15. Do you still watch cartoons?
Oh yeah, but I don’t really care for any of the new stuff. Uptight CGI or poor impersonations of 1960s Hanna-Barbera cartoons. Looney Tunes and the early Tom and Jerry stuff. I really can’t get enough of that. In my opinion The Simpsons is the only great cartoon in years and even that fell apart around Season Seven. Felix the Cat is so wonderfully surreal, and I like the old Max Fleischer stuff, too, Betty Boop, Popeye, and even the old Superman stuff, to a degree. And the Hanna-Barbera stuff from my childhood is hard to top.


Trent Zelazny was born and raised in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He has lived in California, Oregon, Arizona, and Florida. His short story "The House of Happy Mayhem" was selected as one of the best horror stories of 2009, while his novella "Fractal Despondency" has become an Amazon Mystery Bestseller, even if only briefly. He is also a basketball fanatic.

Find him online at his site: www.trentzelazny.com
and his blog:http://trentzelaznybloggetyblog.blogspot.com.

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Wednesday, August 10, 2011

HEIDI'S PICK SIX: Nathan Everett

HEIDI'S PICK SIX


Nathan Everett


1. Which of your characters is your favorite?
I listened to author Mary Doria Russell (The Sparrow, Doc) speak recently about how she fell in love with her characters. But she is a serial monogamist. Once she is through with a character, she moves on and falls in love with the next one. I understand that, but there are threads that keep calling me back to certain characters (some from works I wrote long ago and never published). I love the two leads in my upcoming book The Gutenberg Rubric, but I’ve already returned to my computer forensics detective Dag Hamar from For Blood or Money and am working on a prequel that features him as a much younger man. There is something about Dag that continues to draw me to him.


2. Tell me about your travels.

3. Coffee, tea, or milk?
Hot, strong, and black. I am a coffee drinker. I inherited the trait from both sides of my family and have often used family stories about coffee in my books. Dag Hamar, even with a weak heart and doctor’s orders to stay off caffeine, has a double-espresso pulled over two shots of hot water whenever he can get to his favorite coffee shop. He sums it up this way (straight from my heart):

"Espresso is an art, both in creation and consumption. To drink it, you hold the cup in both hands and absorb the warmth through your fingers as the aroma tickles at the edges of your nose. Don’t go too fast. Don’t dive in and take a drink and burn your tongue. Just hold it there and breathe. Then slowly bring it closer—about four inches from your face—and inhale deeply. A properly-made espresso will pick you up from that distance and jumpstart your heart. I can feel it working before the cup actually touches my lips. The first sip should be mostly crème. That’s the oily foam that rests on top of a freshly-pulled shot of espresso. Just beneath the silky foam comes your first taste of heaven. The coffee is strong enough to dry your mouth out. The flavor washes across the sides of your tongue first then sweeps up to meet in the middle. As soon as the black liquid hits your throat, you are compelled to inhale again, sucking air down with the coffee until your lungs feel like they will explode, then lowering the cup so you don’t cool it, expelling the air out through your mouth in a long sigh."

I don’t talk. I don’t read. I don’t eat. I coffee.


4. What else can you do besides write?
I’m a publisher and book designer, not only of my own works, but for others as well. I do freelance work including everything from cover design to page layout for both print and eBooks. In spite of the fact that the eBook industry is evolving rapidly (yet again), I’m able to produce great looking eBooks every time. Authors should be as proud of the electronic version of their books as they are with the paper they hold in their hands. I have several patents in layout and typography for electronic devices, so I know it from the inside out. I write a column on independent publishing for Line Zero magazine each quarter that deals with different aspects of getting work into print and eBook form.


5. Who are you reading right now?
6. Pop culture or academia?

7. What is the toughest scene you ever wrote?
I always have trouble with book endings. The last scene in For Blood or Money was very painful for me to write and I wrote two (unpublished) sequels before I could put it to rest. On the other hand, the entire story of Steven George & The Dragon was written to get to the last scene. I knew what that was months before I wrote it. I think anytime you write something that is painful for a character you love, it is painful for the author.


8. Where do you find your inspirations to write?
9. Food you could eat everyday.
10. Are you into sports or other physical activities?
11. What kind of music speaks to you?

12. Do you outline your stories or do they just take you along for the ride?
Yes. Different stories require different approaches. I spent months planning and outlining For Blood or Money—entire wall-charts filled with what was happening to each character in each chapter of the story, whether they were in the chapter or not. Then I wrote the entire story in less than 30 days. On the other hand, I had a starting point for an OCD dragonslayer counting the footsteps on his quest and an end-point facing his dragon in Steven George & The Dragon. Neither Steven nor I had any idea how we were going to connect the two. But I wrote that in 30 days as well. The fact that I draft a book in 30 days (that’s my rule), however, doesn’t mean that it’s finished then. I re-write and revise as much as two or three years before I’m satisfied with it enough to publish.


13. Celebrity crush.
14. Who are the biggest influences on your work?

15. Do you still watch cartoons?
I had to answer this question. I never really watched cartoons much when I was growing up, though I loved Mighty Mouse and Tom Terrific. That dates me. But my 18-yo daughter and her friends kept talking about Anime, so I grabbed her Netflix list and started watching The Claymore. One thing led to another and I have watched more cartoons in the past two months than in all the years growing up! I think it’s a phase I’m going through. My wife certainly hopes so!



Nathan Everett has been involved in the publishing industry for over 30 years as a writer, designer, and publisher. He is managing editor of Long Tale Press. He began publishing magazines and trade journals in the early 80s and was among the first “desktop publishers” in the country, training graphic artists and production technicians on the new computerized technology. He has six patents in the field of page layout and typography and worked on the OeBF ePUB 1.1 specification. He is author of four published books, Publication Design from Corporate Publishing (1988), For Blood or Money from Long Tale Press (2009), Feeding the Board (fund-raiser cookbook for Studio East, 2010), and the recently independently-published Steven George & The Dragon (2011). His upcoming thriller, The Gutenberg Rubric, will be released in mid-July.

Nathan lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife, daughter, and two rescued greyhounds. He only writes when it’s raining, so it’s been a very productive year!

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

PATHS TO PUBLICATION: Valentine Brkich

Back in 2003 I decided to go with a vanity press to publish my first book, Cageball, Poker, and the Atomic Wedgie. Bad idea. Not only was it expensive, the company never followed through with any of its promises to help market the book. Plus, the printing costs made it impossible for me to sell the book at a reasonable price. Although I sold over 3,000 copies of the book, I learned my lesson and I knew I’d never trust a vanity press again.

When I was writing my next book, Bridgewater: A Narrative History of a Pennsylvania River Town, I researched starting my own publishing company. Then, at a writer’s conference, I met Dave Lieber, author of The Dog of My Nightmares. Dave published his book through his own company, Yankee Cowboy Press, and he convinced me that I could do the same.

So, when it came time to publish Bridgewater…, that’s just what I did. I started Bridge Street Books and used selfpublishing.com to help me get a good print quote. I ended up going with a company out of New York that was able to print my book at an extremely fair price. I ordered 1000 copies of the book, and in no time at all sold around 250 copies and completely recouped my investment. Any sales I make now are all profit.

I’ve also published it through Kindle Direct Publishing, which allows me to produce an e-book, free of charge, and then sell it for a reasonable price with a nice royalty too.

Although I’ve been working on a new book in my free time, recently I’ve been focusing most of my writing on my blog, valentinebrkich.com, where I write a post once or twice a month about my adventures in raising two young children. Once I publish a post, I link to it both in my Facebook status and on my Twitter feed (@valentinebrkich), which is a great way to get my writing out there to over 500 people with just a few keystrokes and the click of a mouse.

I think this is an exciting time for writers; one where we have choices in how we want to publish our books. I’m a big proponent of e-books and self-publishing, when it’s done right. Does that mean I wouldn’t answer the door if an agent or a publisher came a-knockin’? Of course not. But at least I know that it is possible to do it on my own.

-Valentine Brkich
August 2011


--

A review of Bridgewater: A Narrative History of a Pennsylvania River Town from a Writer’s Digest International Self-Published Book Awards judge:

"I immediately engaged with this little town thanks to the author's great storytelling and the topic's uniqueness as an artifact of Americana. I've read quite a few local histories as part of this contest over the years, but this one stays with me."

Visit Val online at:
www.valentinebrkich.com
Twitter: @valentinebrkich
Facebook: facebook.com/vjbrkich

And in person at the Bridgewater BookFest on September 10, 2011.


Friday, August 05, 2011

ASK THE REVIEWER: Magic of Reading


Magic of Reading


This is the first in a series I'm hosting where I talk with reviewers who have reviewed my books. Today I welcome Leanne Bell from Magic of Reading! She was kind enough to take time out of her reading and blogging schedule to answer some fun questions about herself, her blog, and about my novel Ambasadora.

To read Magic of Reading's full review of Ambasadora visit: http://magicofreading.blogspot.com/2011/07/ambasadora-by-heidi-ruby-miller.html

ABOUT THE REVIEWER

1. What types of books do you review most often?
I will read anything, but usually I tend to review Young Adults, fantasy, sci-fi, historical fiction and romance as I’m usually looking for some escapism when I read.

2. Are there any types of books you won’t review?
Not really since I like to expand my comfort zone all the time and I love to read new books. The way I see it I may as well try a book and if I don’t like it, then at least I tried. :)

3. Do you review more books you've come to on your own or those from authors/publishers?
At first it was those I discovered myself but as my blog has grown and I have gotten more review requests it’s a bit more even now, although I do love browsing for books on my own and the joy of discovering something new while standing in a bookstore.

4. How long does it usually take you to get to a book once it makes it into your TBR pile?
That varies from book to book. I try to get through review requests as quickly as I can but this isn’t always possible as I have to be in the mood to read certain books or I know I won’t be able to read it properly. So as an estimate I’d say a couple of months at the worst and less than a week at best.

5. What do you do if you can't finish a book?
I’m as honest as possible. Luckily all the books I’ve been unable to finish have been bought ones and it’s just myself I have to reconcile. :( I guess if I had a book for review from an author, that would be a bit more difficult, but I’d still be honest about it rather then try and force myself to finish.

6. What is your favorite book ever?
Ah I can’t answer that. lol Too many. I think because of my age My favourite series will be the Harry Potter series since it got me into reading as a reluctant 11 year old (thirteen years ago now, yikes!) As for a standalone favourite novel? I just don’t have one at the moment.

7. Do you like ice cream better than potato chips?
Definitely, I love Ice-cream! Especially anything from the Ben and Jerry’s range…mmmmmmm

ABOUT AMBASADORA

1. Who was your favorite character?
Both Sara and Sean, but if I had to choose, probably Sara. I have nothing but respect for her character; she’s strong, willful and courageous despite everything she faced. The most amazing thing is she knew what she was risking by being defiant and she still did it!

2. What is your favorite setting within the Ambasadora-verse?
I loved the V-side, although I would be reluctant to go there myself, I just love the thought of being able to go to a different place whenever you want. When I consider how constricted the Ambasadora world is and how claustrophobic it would probably be, it’s the only place that seems to have any degree of freedom.

3. Would you rather have a character or a place named after you?
Ooooo a character! Definitely. Especially if that character had the same sort of personality as me, although it would be a bit weird at first reading about myself. I’m the sort of person who would then take the book everywhere and go: "Look, I’m in a book!" :)

4. What would you like to see in future books within the Ambasadora-verse?
I would love to know what happens to Sean and Sara next, I really really want to know. Oh, and more about Mari and David. I would also like to see if there are any changes to the world because of the rebellion, and the impact Sara had.

5. Would you ever want to travel to the V-side?
Partly yes, I think it would be pretty awesome to assume a new identity and just be a different person, but then I’d be pretty scared of never coming back, especially after reading what happened to some of the Fraggers.

Want to know more about Magic of Reading? Leave your question in a comment below and check out these links:


http://magicofreading.blogspot.com


http://www.facebook.com/MagicOfReading


http://twitter.com/MagicOfReading


http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/3355959-leanne-magic-of-reading-bell

If you would like Magic of Reading to consider a book for review, e-mail magic_of_reading@hotmail.co.uk.

If you would like to review Ambasadora, email Heidi at heidirubymiller@gmail.com.

Monday, August 01, 2011

PATHS TO PUBLICATION: Jon Sprunk

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The Shadow Saga by Jon Sprunk

I had been writing for several years, piling up three full novel manuscripts, a dozen shorts, plus countless false starts, but I felt defeated by the mountain of rejection slips I'd accumulated. When I got the idea for a new book about a lonewolf assassin pitted against an entire country, I worked feverishly to get it down on paper. Well, computer drive.

When the manuscript was complete and polished to the best of my ability, I considered where I should submit it. I had just finished the First Law series by Joe Abercrombie, and was struck by some of the similarities in theme and execution between Joe's books and mine. So I wrote an email to the U.S. editor, Lou Anders of Pyr Books, to say how much I'd enjoyed the books, and also to inquire whether he would like to see my new book. Lo and behold, he agreed to read a sample.

When Lou came back with a request to see the rest of the book, I was on Cloud Nine. The next few days were the longest of my life. I'll never forget how I felt when I read his acceptance letter offering to publish my book. After two decades of pursuit, I had finally accomplished one of my most personal and hard-fought goals.

And that's how it all began.

--Jon Sprunk
August 2011


Reviews for Shadow's Son:

"Overall, a first-rate sword-and-sorcery tale, with intriguing characters, that moves at a quick pace." -- Booklist

"Masterful storytelling at its finest, be prepared for a late night." --Maria V. Snyder, New York Times bestselling author.

"I highly look forward to the sequel and give this novel 5 stars as it deserves keeper status. Recommend for fantasy fans of the sword and sorcery genre and fans of assassin leads." --Night Owl Reviews

"Shadow's Son is easily one of my favorite books of 2010 and I look forward to seeing what Sprunk can add to this trilogy." --Fantasy Book Critic, reviewed by Cindy


cover blurb for Shadow's Son:

In the holy city of Othir, treachery and corruption lurk at the end of every street, just the place for a freelance assassin with no loyalties and few scruples.

Caim makes his living on the edge of a blade, but when a routine job goes south, he is thrust into the middle of an insidious plot. Pitted against crooked lawmen, rival killers, and sorcery from the Other Side, his only allies are Josephine, the socialite daughter of his last victim, and Kit, a guardian spirit no one else can see. But in this fight for his life, Caim only trusts his knives and his instincts, but they won't be enough when his quest for justice leads him from Othir's hazardous back alleys to its shining corridors of power. To unmask a conspiracy at the heart of the empire, he must claim his birthright as the Shadow's Son . . .

Visit Jon online at his website: www.jonsprunk.com and his blog: http://jonsprunk.blogspot.com.

Buy his books:
Shadow's Son
Shadow's Lure

Event: WPF In Your Write Mind at Seton Hill - Day 4 Photos

Events

From the Seton Hill University Writing Popular Fiction MFA Graduation: