Saturday, November 17, 2012

SFFS: Snippet #3 from Atomic Zion

Atomic Zion

DESCRIPTION:
I've skipped ahead a couple of pages in the first chapter for this snippet from my SF Thriller, Atomic Zion, which is in its final revisions. The book was influenced by my time as the Educational Marketing Director at Frank Lloyd Wright's House on Kentuck Knob and by reading stories from Michael Crichton, Robert Ludlum, James Rollins, and Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child.

Back Cover Blurb...

On the night of his 90th birthday, a former Wright Apprentice is thrown from the fifth floor of the Guggenheim Museum in New York. The only clue to clear his grandson of the murder is a note written in Navajo code which warns "The Bear has awakened."

These four words throw Nick Vanko into the middle of a decades old international cover-up where Wright Apprentices encoded WWII-era secrets about genetic experimentation into their blueprints. In order to stop a being who isn't quite human from unleashing a biological weapon upon the U.S., Nick must find Broadacre City, the fabled utopia designed by Wright, but supposedly never built. Searching by his side are an old Navajo CodeTalker, a woman who sees emotions as colors, and a Mossad agent who is really working for the Russian mafia. But can Vanko trust any of them?
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SNIPPET #1
SNIPPET #2
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SNIPPET #3:

Skovajsa believed he could be like the lieutenant...one day. But today he remained frightened Jakub, his mind betraying him with its paranoia.

Was someone waiting for them? Their approach had been camouflaged by pine forests for the past two kilometers, and the landscape was such that they could see out of the forest to the rocky outcrop without being noticed in the trees' shadows. They would be most exposed for the hundred meters between the forest's edge and the cave entrance.

The lieutenant put up a hand to halt the group before the sun's rays could fall upon them. Out came the binoculars.

Minutes passed.

He gave hand signals telling Skovajsa's line to get low and move forward. The rest would cover them from the trees.
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Find other wonderful snippets at Science Fiction Fantasy Saturday!

22 comments:

  1. You know I can't wait for this to be released...I'm sure I've told you that already. :) Great snippet. I can feel the suspense building nicely!!

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    1. I can't wait for it to be released either, T. K.! Thanks. :)

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  2. What an interesting premise! Nice to see the Native American touch, too.

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    1. Thanks, Lyndi! The Native American inspiration came from my friend Sonja and our time together in the Disney College Program.

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  3. This sounds GREAT! What an awesome premise (oh, and good snippet, too!). Can't wait for this one.

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    1. Thank you, Cary! So good to see you back. :)

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  4. There is a very palpable & real sense of building tension here that really resounds. Call me silly, but methinks something very bad is about to happen. Would love to know more.

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    1. Glad the tension came through, Jeffrey. And, you would be right about the something bad....

      :) Heidi

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  5. This type of suspense is the kind that coils in your stomach--just the kind I love. You've got spot on details, both physically and mentally for this character. Fantastic.

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    1. "This type of suspense is the kind that coils in your stomach--just the kind I love."

      I want to use this as a blurb! Ha!

      Thanks, J.M.

      :) Heidi

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  6. And, luck would have it that the excitement happens while they're in that 100m span. Great stuff! Looking forward to this story's release.

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    1. Luck--that's actually a minor theme in this book, Patrick. For good of for bad.

      ;) Heidi

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    1. You can say that again, Sue!

      Thanks for dropping by.

      :) Heidi

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  8. Love the tension in this. As always, your description is excellent. I could almost smell the pine needles.

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    1. I learned about description from the best at Seton Hill, Ann. ;)

      Thanks!

      :) Heidi

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  9. I went back to reread the first two snippets - yours is a good example of a sequence that really works far better with the full body of the text, rather than just 10 sentences. Slow-building tension and unease, and a strong sense that something is going to happen. Really good sequence.

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    1. You are so right about 10 sentences not being enough, Peter!

      Thanks.

      :) Heidi

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  10. Great tension through this. I read it so fast, I had to go back and read it again!

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